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astrodidact:

Vitamin B3 might have been made in space, delivered to Earth by meteoritesKaren Smith crushes meteorites with a mortar and pestle in Goddard’s Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory to prepare them for analysis. Vitamin B3 was found in all eight meteorites analyzed in the study. Credit: Karen Smith

Ancient Earth might have had an extraterrestrial supply of vitamin B3…

thatscienceguy:

Amazing electron microscope imagery! (some of these have been artificially colored)

More Sciency Galleries - http://thatscienceguy.bestgalleries.me/

Oh, I have plenty of biases, all right. I’m quite biased toward depending upon what my senses and my intellect tell me about the world around me, and I’m quite biased against invoking mysterious mythical beings that other people want to claim exist but which they can offer no evidence for.

By telling students that the beliefs of a superstitious tribe thousands of years ago should be treated on an equal basis with the evidence collected with our most advanced equipment today is to completely undermine the entire process of scientific inquiry.

And one more thing: In your original message you identified yourself as an elementary school teacher. If you are going to insist on holding to a creationist viewpoint, then please stay away from my children. I want my kids to learn about “real” science, and how the “real” world operates, and not be fed the mythical goings-on in the fantasy-land of creationism.
Alan Hale, physicist, aerospace engineer, and co-discoverer of the Comet Hale-Bopp, in a series of e-mails starting Jan. 14, 1999, found at http://www.infidels.org/kiosk/article713.html (via academicatheism)

(via sagansense)

terrorfromtheyear5000:

joshbyard:

Google X Lab Files Patent for Contact Lens With Built-In Camera

Google has invented a new smart contact lens with an integrated camera. The camera would be very small and sit near the edge of the contact lens so that it doesn’t obscure your vision. By virtue of being part of the contact lens, the camera would naturally follow your gaze, allowing for a huge range of awesome applications, from the basis of a bionic eye system for blind and visually impaired people, through to early warning systems (the camera spots a hazard before your brain does), facial recognition, and superhuman powers (telescopic and infrared/night vision). 

(via Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come | ExtremeTech)

Google: Oh, and we’ll be watching at all times. Thanks sorry you’re welcome!

thecraftychemist:

Scale of the universe

Scroll to your hearts content from the Planck length to the diameter of the observable universe - click on any object and it will open an info box - I can’t imagine how much work must have gone into this. A few surprising things: Pluto has a smaller diameter than the width of the USA and Vatican city can fit in central park multiple times.

Find it here

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

Conductors and Insulators

In a conductor, electric current can flow freely, in an insulator it cannot. Metals such as copper typify conductors, while most non-metallic solids are said to be good insulators, having extremely high resistance to the flow of charge through them. “Conductor” implies that the outer electrons of the atoms are loosely bound and free to move through the material. Most atoms hold on to their electrons tightly and are insulators. In copper, the valence electrons are essentially free and strongly repel each other. Any external influence which moves one of them will cause a repulsion of other electrons which propagates, “domino fashion” through the conductor.

Simply stated, most metals are good electrical conductors, most nonmetals are not. Metals are also generally good heat conductors while nonmetals are not.

policymic:

Tracking US drone strikes? Now there’s an app for that

Last week, New York-based web developer Josh Begley answered that question with the launch of “MetaData+,” an iPhone app that sends an alert to your phone every time the United States conducts a drone strike.

He created the app in 2012 under the original name Drones+, but Apple rejected the app five times, taking nearly two years for the app to be available to the public.

The App Review Board claimed that Begley’s app was “not useful or entertaining enough” and something that “many audiences would find objectionable.”

Begley even spoke with a representative from Apple on the phone, who said that if the app was about drones, it just wasn’t going to be approved. Finally, after he removed the word “drone” from both the name and the description, the app was accepted.

Read more | Follow policymic

(via dreadiron)